Skip to content
Dror Poleg
Exploring the future of work, cities, and human communities — online and off. As seen in The New York Times, WSJ, FT, NBC, etc.

Recent Posts

Members Public

The Crypto Future of Work

Things are done differently in the world of blockchains and decentralized finance. And they offer a vision of what all careers and corporations could look like one day.

The Crypto Future of Work
Members Public

The Epic Opportunity

The love life of a 1960s Czech doctor offers invaluable career advice for 2020.

The Epic Opportunity
Members Public

The Long Chin

Your job must be performed in person? That will not save you from online competition. New data on the Long Tail offers some evidence.

The Long Chin
Members Public

Explicit Economics

In the future, we'll pay to work, get paid to consume, and gamble to keep our money safe.

Explicit Economics
Members Public

No Floor, No Ceiling

The internet gives more people an opportunity to win. But it forces everyone to play the game.

No Floor, No Ceiling
Members Public

Raiders of the lost Bank

Want to know the future of work? Don't ask a Wall Street CEO. Ask a protocol.

Raiders of the lost Bank
Members Public

The Token Society

Cryptocurrencies will change the way we work, live, and love.

The Token Society
Members Public

The TINA Economy

Young people are tired of paying for the illusion of safety. Is there no alternative?

The TINA Economy
Members Public

Lovers and Leavers

Online performers are demolishing corrupt institutions and creating new opportunities and anxieties for everyone else.

Lovers and Leavers
Members Public

Winner Takes Most

The internet matches us with those who'd pay most for our unique combination of skills and characteristics. It also exposes us to anxieties that were previously reserved only for pop stars.

Winner Takes Most
Members Public

The Ponzi Career

The future of work is a pyramid scheme, where every person sells his favorite person to the next person.

The Ponzi Career
Members Public

The Talent Equation

In-person interaction contributes to creativity. But is it enough to offset a shortage of talent?

The Talent Equation
Members Public

NFTs and the Future of Work

Technology will make it possible to compensate each person according to their economic value. That’s pretty bad news for most people, and very good news for some.

NFTs and the Future of Work
Members Public

Krugman is wrong about the internet. Again.

Remote work will do to the office what e-books did to stores. And that's bad news for most cities and offices.

Krugman is wrong about the internet. Again.
Members Public

Brute-force Creativity

Testing random ideas is a robot's way of being creative. And it can do so faster than any human.

Brute-force Creativity
Members Public

The Office Prisoner's Dilemma

Once some companies embrace remote work, all companies are forced to embrace remote work.

The Office Prisoner's Dilemma
Members Public

Remote Bullying

The shift to remote work could kill office culture. For employees in some industries, that's pretty good news. First among these industries is finance. The culture at some of the world's largest money managers is notoriously harsh, particularly towards younger employees. Many companies have individual bullies and offenders. But in

Remote Bullying
Members Public

The Future of Work is Unreal.

We don't want virtual meetings to feel more real. We want better masks.

The Future of Work is Unreal.
Members Public

The Data Disease (and Cure)

If data is the new oil, free countries can pull ahead by accumulating less of it.

The Data Disease (and Cure)
Members Public

Work, Cities, and Offices in a World of Infinite Choice

First, a couple of updates: Rethink with your ears:  The audio version of Rethinking Real Estate is now available on Audible. Get it here. Rethink in Korean: Later this week, the Korean-language version of the book will be published — and will be available for purchase here.  Last week, I spoke

Work, Cities, and Offices in a World of Infinite Choice