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The Ponzi Career

The future of work is a pyramid scheme, where every person sells his favorite person to the next person.

The Ponzi Career
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The Talent Equation

In-person interaction contributes to creativity. But is it enough to offset a shortage of talent?

The Talent Equation
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NFTs and the Future of Work

Technology will make it possible to compensate each person according to their economic value. That’s pretty bad news for most people, and very good news for some.

NFTs and the Future of Work
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Krugman is wrong about the internet. Again.

Remote work will do to the office what e-books did to stores. And that's bad news for most cities and offices.

Krugman is wrong about the internet. Again.
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Brute-force Creativity

Testing random ideas is a robot's way of being creative. And it can do so faster than any human.

Brute-force Creativity
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The Office Prisoner's Dilemma

Once some companies embrace remote work, all companies are forced to embrace remote work.

The Office Prisoner's Dilemma
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Remote Bullying

The shift to remote work could kill office culture. For employees in some industries, that's pretty good news. First among these industries is finance. The culture at some of the world's largest money managers is notoriously harsh, particularly towards younger employees. Many companies have individual bullies and offenders. But in

Remote Bullying
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The Future of Work is Unreal.

We don't want virtual meetings to feel more real. We want better masks.

The Future of Work is Unreal.
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The Data Disease (and Cure)

If data is the new oil, free countries can pull ahead by accumulating less of it.

The Data Disease (and Cure)
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Work, Cities, and Offices in a World of Infinite Choice

First, a couple of updates: Rethink with your ears:  The audio version of Rethinking Real Estate is now available on Audible. Get it here. Rethink in Korean: Later this week, the Korean-language version of the book will be published — and will be available for purchase here.  Last week, I spoke

Work, Cities, and Offices in a World of Infinite Choice
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Bezos and Offline Day One

Offline in the 2020s is like online in the 1990s.

Bezos and Offline Day One
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WeWork and Poetry

This week's newsletter is made of video and voice. Text will resume next week. I am sending this from my new website, which you are very welcome to visit and share: DrorPoleg.com. WeWork in PublicWeWork is rumored to be looking at going public again. The WSJ reports that the

WeWork and Poetry
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The 2020s: A Decade of Passionate Intensity

2020 is over and things are finally going back to normal. Or not. A recording of my keynote at CBRE Ireland's Market Outlook event.

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WeWork, Miami, and the Future of Cities

Immigration is a vexed issue. It was at the heart of some of the greatest political upheavals of the past few years. Within the field of economics, the debate around immigration tends to focus on the bottom line: Are destination countries better off by letting people in? To date, the

WeWork, Miami, and the Future of Cities
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Canceling the Street

Online filter bubbles create offline filter bubbles.

Canceling the Street
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Bitcoins and Buildings

Virtual currencies have a soothing message for physical assets.

Bitcoins and Buildings
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The Office as a Choice

My latest piece in The New York Times, available here: The Future of Offices When Workers Have a Choice

The Office as a Choice
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Cities & Buildings: 6 Things to Watch in 2021

In February, I was in London to launch my new book. It was weeks before a pandemic overwhelmed the West. My keynote at the launch focused on contagion of a different sort — a contagion of abundance. I contended that the world was on the cusp of a new era where

Cities & Buildings: 6 Things to Watch in 2021
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Slack and the Imaginary Economy.

The world's hottest workplace chat app is bad for business but good for society.

Slack and the Imaginary Economy.
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Airbnb in Context

It's not about travel, it's about housing.

Airbnb in Context
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On the internet, nobody's knows you're a god.

Remote work makes it easier for new types of employees to join the talent pool.

On the internet, nobody's knows you're a god.
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Rise of the 10X Class

The "robber barons" of the 21st Century are the people who used to sit next to you at the office.

Rise of the 10X Class
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Stop and Continue

I am still working on the weekly article. It’ll be ready by Sunday, I hope. In the meantime, I’ll leave you with this photo from Incheon airport and this quote from Erich Fromm’s Art of Loving: Modern man has exceedingly little self-discipline outside of the sphere of

Stop and Continue
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The TikTokization of Work

Initially, economic anxiety spares those who can work remotely. Then, it spares no one.

The TikTokization of Work
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The Disconnected Office

My baby daughter taught me that sharing a space is the best way to ignore each other and produce great work.

The Disconnected Office
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Canceling the City

The balance between creativity and conformity is being disrupted, with dire consequences for cities. A hundred-year-old theory helps explain why.

Canceling the City
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The Future of Work is Medieval

Students of international relations have been concerned with the return of the Middle Ages for a while. Political scientists have observed the relative decline in the power of nation-states and the growing importance of supernational military and trade organizations. These organizations — the UN, WHO, WTO, NATO, even the EU — are

The Future of Work is Medieval
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COVID? NYC's Real Problem is the Internet

The Big Apple has seen it all. But it hasn't seen this.

COVID? NYC's Real Problem is the Internet
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Can Cities Go Extinct? (Part 1)

The internet was supposed to make cities redundant. Its moment might finally be here.

Can Cities Go Extinct? (Part 1)
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WeWork & Airbnb will be Fine

The disruptors of office and lodging are seeing the world reborn in their image.

WeWork & Airbnb will be Fine