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inequality

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A Bicycle of Inequality

Computers multiply the powers of the human mind. But they affect each person differently, very differently.

A Bicycle of Inequality
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Quiet Quitting, UBI, and Psychic Inequality

You can redistribute money, but can you redistribute meaning? The entertainment industry offers some lessons.

Quiet Quitting, UBI, and Psychic Inequality
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The Scalable Imagination

We tend to underestimate technology's power to turn in-person work into scalable work. On the verge of the 20th Century, the world's leading economist thought that singers would never make too much money because their voices could not reach beyond a single room. In Principles of Economics, Alfred Marshal wrote

The Scalable Imagination
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Productivity and Inequality

Yesterday, I wrote about the 50-fold increase in the productivity of manual laborers in the 20th Century. In the decades ahead, experiments with new work arrangements are expected to lead to similar increases in the productivity of knowledge workers. But there is a key difference between manual labor and knowledge

Productivity and Inequality
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Inequality and Remote Work

"If you can do your job from Boulder, it can be moved to Bangalore." This tweet from Scott Galloway makes a common argument regarding why employees should rush back to the office. It also taps into a sense of anxiety that one's job is about to be "shipped" away. The

Inequality and Remote Work
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Winner Takes Most

The internet matches us with those who'd pay most for our unique combination of skills and characteristics. It also exposes us to anxieties that were previously reserved only for pop stars.

Winner Takes Most
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NFTs and the Future of Work

Technology will make it possible to compensate each person according to their economic value. That’s pretty bad news for most people, and very good news for some.

NFTs and the Future of Work
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Rise of the 10X Class

The "robber barons" of the 21st Century are the people who used to sit next to you at the office.

Rise of the 10X Class